As an aspiring landscape photographer,  I have the opportunity to explore less traveled parks and remote wilderness areas. This blog shares of my "notes from the field," including photography techniques, hiking tips and lessons learned the hard way ... like the time I fell through the ice in the Merced River, Yosemite National Park.  I welcome your comments and thank you for visiting our site.   Marcus W. Reinkensmeyer, Field Photographer 

Superstition Mountains Storm

September 13, 2014  •  12 Comments

“… The winds will blow their own freshness into you and the storms their energy, while cares will drop off like autumn leaves. As age comes on, one source of enjoyment after another is closed, but nature's sources never fail.”   -  Our National Parks, John Muir, 1901

 

<--- Capture My Arizona Photo of the Day

 

Last Saturday afternoon, I received a call from my good friend and fellow photographer, Randy Dannheim, inviting me out to shoot "the storm."  Gazing out my house window, I could see only the typical blue Arizona desert sky and a few scattered clouds. Randy explained that clouds would soon "consolidate," creating some great photo opportunities if we could just keep a safe distance from the impending downpour.

 

Somewhat reluctantly, I agreed to this impromptu trek, having little expectation of any dramatic weather scenes. To explain, while any opportunity for photography is always good, I've never had much luck with serious landscape photography under the harsh summer light in the Phoenix area.  How mistaken I was that day.

 

Driving into Lost Dutchman Park a couple of hours later, we were awe struck by the ominous dark skies over the Superstition Mountains. Our set-up and shooting at the park was fast paced and a bit hectic, lasting only 30 minutes. Gusting winds ushered in erratic spitting rain, as lightning flashes appeared on the distant horizon.   Right before us, though, the rugged mountain range was aglow in warm "Golden Hour" sunlight from the western horizon.

 

The real drama occurred a few minutes after we exited the park, driving east on AZ 88 towards Apache Lake. A faint rainbow emerged over the Superstition Mountains, seemingly demarcating the sky with vivid orange in one expanse and blue-gray in the other.

 

Setting up our tripods on the roadside, we took a few quick photographs of the rainbow. It was then that we were overwhelmed to see what appeared to be an advancing, vertical wall of orange dust and rain awash in an eerie glowing light.  Being from the Midwest, I immediately thought of tornado-like conditions. Here again, in a matter of minutes, strong winds and pelting rain forced us back into our vehicle. 

 

From there, we turned around and headed home, intent on leaving the rolling foothills before the dry "wash" areas would flood with watershed from the Superstition Mountains. We encountered massive rains on our drive back home and the storm raged on well into the night.

 

EPILOGUE:  Randy was more "in the know" than I initially realized on this unforgettable evening.  The dramatic weather system we witnessed was, in part, a remnant of Hurricane Norbert, a tropical storm off Mexico's Baja Coast.  Massive rains ultimately resulted in a record 50 year flood in the Valley of the Sun, with Arizona's Governor declaring a state of emergency the following Monday morning. 

 

The lesson of the day: Listen closely to your friends and daily weather forecasts.

 

Related weather photography posts:  White Pocket Weather on the Plateau, Deep Freeze Landscape Photography, The Wave, White Sands - Dunes Storm and Snow Laced Grand Canyon.

 

Marcus W. Reinkensmeyer

www.mwrphotos.com 


New Mexico Landscape Photography, Part 4: Carlsbad Caverns

September 06, 2014  •  5 Comments

“I am gradually becoming impressed with the Carlsbad Caverns; they are so strange and deep in the earth that I can never feel about them as I do with things in the sun -- rocks, trees ... surf and fog. The photographic problems are terrific; I start with a basic exposure of about 10 minutes ... I then boost up the image and "drama" with photoflash.”  -  Ansel Adams

NIKON D800E,f/8 @ 35 mm1/60ISO 200Flash 

As an extension or our photography trek to White Sands National Monument, we spent a day at Carlsbad Caverns National Park in the rugged Guadalupe Mountains of Southeastern New Mexico. Given our pressed schedule, I wondered if a caverns visit would be worth the extra driving time from White Sands. We pondered, "Is the cavern overrun with tourists, can we really get any good photos under artificial lighting and are the underground formations really that unique?" 

In short, Carlsbad Caverns proved to be a photogenic natural wonder, albeit with some challenges and inherent limitations in the photography arena.

Located 18 miles south of Carlsbad on U.S. Highway 62/180, the vast cavern is situated in a bed of limestone, above the groundwater level. The history and geology of the cavern are absolutely fascinating, far beyond the scope of this posting.   In short, the area surrounding the caverns was a coastline of an ancient inland sea, tectonic movements uplifted Capitan reef above ground and erosion of limestone created intricate calcium carbonate formations:  stalactites, stalagmites, soda straws, draperies and popcorn, etc. 

NIKON D800E,f/8 @ 82 mm5sISO 200No Flash 

To learn about the caverns and gain a sense of orientation, we participated in the ranger guided tour of the King’s Palace chambers in the morning. The tour was informative time well spend, but not conducive to serious photography because tripods are not allowed on guided tours.

We then spent the afternoon on a self guided photo shoot of the Big Room (Hall of Giants), a vast series of chambers with railed walkways some 800 feet below ground.  Here, we were able set up our tripods for long time exposures (8 – 30 seconds at ISO 200, f 8).  We had hoped to carry only our medium length "walk around" lenses (e.g., 24 – 70 mm) into the caverns, but ended up needing the Nikon "holy trinity," including the 17 – 35 mm wide angle and 70 -200 mm telephoto lenses,  to capture the varying sense of scale in different cavern chambers.   

NIKON D800E,f/2.8 @ 44 mm1/60ISO 400Flash 

Although flash photography is allowed throughout the caverns, most of the photo blogs advise against flash as it washes out the foreground of lighted formations. Although this was the situation with many of the front-lit major formations, I found that my Nikon 910 Speedlight flash unit provided wonderful illumination on some of the formations having little or no artificial lighting, including intricate overhead stalactites and highly detailed draperies.  Experimentation proved fruitful, as I ended shooting the most scenic cavern formations in both modes.

NIKON D800E,f/8 @ 70 mm1/60ISO 200Flash 

Achieving accurate white balance proved to be our greatest challenge and, quite honestly, we encountered impossible lighting situations in large parts of the cavern.  We learned that different lighting systems are used throughout the cavern - probably tungsten, halogen and fluorescent – with widely varying color temperatures.  Matters are complicated by the use of mixed lighting systems on many of the larger and more interesting, iconic formations. 

NIKON D800E,f/2.8 @ 40 mm1/125ISO 6400No Flash  

Under these circumstances, we found ourselves spending too much time manually adjusting our cameras for proper white balance, only to produce otherwise strong photos with a garish green or deep orange-gold color cast.  After several rounds, my practical minded brother, Brian Reinkensmeyer, finally declared, “I am shooting everything in Auto white balance mode. We can fix the color balance back at home ….”  And I followed Brian’s excellent advice, for the most part, only to find the same irreconcilable color balance situation in many images back on my trusty home computer monitor. 

Using the white balance temperature settings in Photoshop’s RAW converter, I have tried my best to present the mixed lighting cavern images as realistically as possible. To get around this problem all together, we’ve also presented some of of our favorite and most challenging color balance photos in black and white as well, using the Nik Silver Efex Pro plug in for B&W conversion. 

VIDEO: Below Ground, Apple iPhone 5

Setting these frustrations aside, for me, the impact of our Carlsbad Caverns visit transcends the sensory experience and emotion of any two dimensional photograph we might present.  It was, and remains, an unforgettable exposure (no pun intended) to a whole new underground world - a truly unique living ecosystem created over millions of years. Resting quietly 75 stories below the surface of the earth, in total darkness, the forces of nature converge in a most intriguing geology: a wonder best experienced by quiet time in a vast winding cavern.   

Marcus W. Reinkensmeyer

www.mwrphotos.com

 

Related posts:  New Mexico Landscape Photography, Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3, Death Valley National Park, California.


New Mexico Landscape Photography, Part 3: White Sands Dunes Formations

August 21, 2014  •  4 Comments

"… life is a jewel box,  is endless as the sand, impossible to count, pure …” Pablo Neruda  on Engimas (1904 - 1973)


My lifetime fascination with sand dunes is now only heightened, having just spent some extended time at the pristine White Sands National Monument, New Mexico (elevation 4,235) feet. Growing up in Southwest Michigan, I developed a deep appreciation for sand dunes along the seemingly endless beaches of Lake Michigan. 

 NIKON D800E,f/20 @ 35 mm1/100ISO 100

The dunes at White Sands hold similar visual elements, including concave and convex formations, intricate interlocking ripples and subtle gradations from shadow to light. 

NIKON D800E,f/3.2 @ 35 mm1/100ISO 100 

Under ever changing lighting conditions, the White Sands gypsum crystal dunes provide endless photography opportunities akin to, yet distinctly unique from those of iconic Death Valley, picturesque Monument Valley and my home state’s Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore.  

 

 

Like pure white freshly fallen snow, the white sand reflects the subtle color hues of the overhead sky, long “golden hour” sunrays and moonlight.  So, for today’s posting, we present fewer words and more images in celebration of White Sands and its many splendors.

 

 

 

NIKON D800E,f/22 @ 86 mm1/40ISO 100 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NIKON D800E,f/20 @ 70 mm1/25ISO 100

 

 

Photographer Traversing Wind Sands Dune at Dusk, Nikon D800. Photo courtesy of my brother and wonderful travel companion, Brian G. Reinkensmeyer, Copyright 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NIKON D800E,f/16 @ 27 mm6sISO 100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VIDEO: White Sands Morning, Apple iPhone 5s

 

Marcus W. Reinkensmeyer

www.mwrphotos.com

 

Related posts:  New Mexico Landscape Photography Part 1, Part 2, Death Valley National Park, California, and Sleeping Bear Dunes, Michigan


New Mexico Landscape Photography, Part 2: White Sands Dunes Trek

July 17, 2014  •  6 Comments

“To see a world in a grain of sand and a heaven in a wildflower, hold infinity in the palm of your hand and eternity in an hour.”  - William Blake (1757 – 1827)

 

Our recent photography trek to White Sands National Monument (elevation 4,235 feet) exceeded my expectations.   My brother, Brian Reinkensmeyer, and I were graced with excellent weather, superb lighting conditions and photo ops galore.

NIKON D800E,f/22 @ 70 mm1/40ISO 100 

While the winter season has shorter daylight hours, we were pleased to find that the soft light and low angle of the sun allowed us to photograph the dunes well beyond the recommended "golden hour."

NIKON D800E,f/20 @ 24 mm1/6ISO 200

Located in south central New Mexico, the mountain ringed White Sands National Monument is situated in the vast Tularosa Basin. The white gypsum dunes occupy 115 square miles of a massive dunes field encompassing a total of 275 square miles. The remaining portion of the dunes and the perimeter mountain ranges (San Andres and Sacramento Mountain Ranges) are all part of the highly secure, strategic White Sands Missile Range.  Just down the road is Holloman Air Force base. With this strong military presence, we noted lots of intrigue about the early years of weapons development, space technology and national security.  

Our biggest challenge in photographing the dunes was working around the ubiquitous footprints left by hikers, sledders and other equally enthusiastic photographers. You can imagine our disappointment time after time, upon hiking to the summit of a dramatic convex sand formation only to find two or three sets of deep footprints.  This situation was especially problematical on our arrival day, Sunday, in the aftermath of many weekend park visitors.  

NIKON D800E,f/18 @ 36 mm1/80ISO 100  

As luck would have it, the dunes were swept clean of footprints in a fierce evening sand storm that same evening.  Fortunately, having experienced these sand storms at Death Valley, we were outfitted with eye goggles, hats covering our ears and protective plastic sleeves for our cameras (Ruggard RC-P18 rain cover, available at B&H Photo).  We've also found that it's helpful to wear Gaitors (Outdoor Research brand, available at REI stores) boot covers to keep the sand out of our shoes.

With or without the low visibility of a sandstorm, it’s all too easy to lose one’s sense of direction and to get lost in the ubiquitous white gypsum dunes. We find it imperative to carry two handheld Garman GPS units our hikes in the dunes, both at White Sands and Death Valley National Park (Eureka and Mesquite Flat Dunes).  Navigating via GPS gives us true peace of mind, providing wayfinding ability in darkness and amidst blinding sandstorms alike.

D800E,f/20 @ 35 mm1/20ISO 100

A special thanks to the highly knowledgeable White Sands rangers (Kelly, Kathy and Bob), who provided extensive information on the park and nearby areas.  We could not have asked for better support, both on-site and prior to our visit.  Kudos to the park service! 

NIKON D800E,f/22 @ 62 mm1/15ISO 100 

 

 

 

Related post: New Mexico Landscape Photography, Part 1: White Sands Dunes to Carlsbad Caverns

 

 

VIDEO: White Sands, Apple iPhone 5s

 

Marcus W. Reinkensmeyer

www.mwrphotos.com


New Mexico Landscape Photography, Part 1: White Sands Dunes to Carlsbad Caverns

June 26, 2014  •  3 Comments

“It is not a country of light on things. It is a country of things in light.” - Painter Georgia O’Keefe (1887 – 1986), commenting on the State of New Mexico.

 

Most every landscape photographer has a “bucket” list of scenic locations; places ripe with photo opportunities in the mind’s eye.  For many years, White Sands National Monument has remained at the top of my ambitious list.  Yet, I was somehow hesitant to invest the necessary time and energy into a White Sands trip, mistakenly thinking that it might not be worthwhile to visit this single location “just to shoot some dunes.”

Morning Light, White Sands, NIKON D800E, f/18 @ 70 mm1/10ISO 200 

Having just returned from a whirlwind trek to the White Sands dunes and other “nearby” scenic areas, I am most grateful for the incredible experience, a better understanding of this vast Southwest region and a batch of fresh photos. 

In planning for the trip to White Sands, my brother, Brian Reinkensmeyer, and I charted visits to a number of other locations ideally suited for hiking and field photography: Carlsbad Caverns, historic petroglyphs at Three Rivers, lava beds at Valley of the Fires and Guadalupe National Park (Texas).   All total, we drove approximately 1,500 miles over a five day period, starting our trip in Phoenix, Arizona. 

Winter Dune Trees, White Sands, NIKON D800E, f/20 @ 55 mm1/40ISO 100

To maximize our time photography, we scheduled much of the longer drives in the evening hours:

  • Day 1:  Drive from Phoenix to hotel in Alamogordo, NM.

  • Day 2:  Early morning photography at Three Rivers Petroglyphs (north of Tularosa) and the lava beds at Valley of the Fires recreation area,       Carrizozo; Meeting with park rangers at White Sands to arrange and pay for off hours passes; Sunset photography at White Sands.

  • Day 3: Sunrise photography at White Sands, photography of dilapidated buildings in Alamogordo, sunset photography at White Sands; drive   to Carlsbad Caverns (161 miles)

Summit Sand Ripples, White Sands, NIKON CORPORATION NIKON D800E, f/22 @ 70 mm1/20ISO 100

Day 4:  Guided tour and self guided photography tour at Carlsbad Caverns; sunset photography of El Capitan at Guadalupe Mountains National Park (elevation: 8,749 feet) and the nearby salt flats; drive back to Alamogordo.

  • Day 5: Sunset photography at White Sands; drive back to Phoenix for mini family reunion dinner. 

Convergence, Carlsbad Cavern, NIKON CORPORATION NIKON D800E, f/8 @ 35 mm1/60ISO 200Flash

Our trip planning was guided by Laurent Martres’ Photographing the Southwest, Volume 2, an excellent resource for both hiking and photography in Arizona and New Mexico. 

Experiencing the grandeur and solitude of Southern New Mexico has only prompted us to add a few more of this state's destinations to the ever growing bucket list.

El Capitan, Guadalupe Mountains, Texas, NIKON CORPORATION NIKON D800, f/4 @ 38 mm1/90ISO 400

 

Marcus W. Reinkensmeyer

www.mwrphotos.com

Related posts: Death Valley National Park, California and Sleeping Bear Dunes, Michigan.